Topic:

Dunes

What's happening at dailyheadspa:

Follow the rhythm of the days on daily headspa: mondays start a new topic; tuesdays look into it; wednesdays look into it further; thursdays do something with it; fridays go out with it; saturdays have fun with it; sundays make space for it. enjoy!

enjoy yourself!

Like Minds
Wednesday
Dec072011

What price progress?

How about this from Cornell University, by Susan Lang

Diners in an "upscale casual" restaurant spent an average of $5.55 -- about 8 percent -- more when the menu did not use dollar signs, reports a Cornell study published in the International Journal of Hospitality Management (28:1).
"Changing the menu typography is like picking the low-hanging fruit," says doctoral student Sybil Yang, who co-authored the study with Sheryl E. Kimes, professor of operations management at the School of Hotel Administration, and Mauro Sessarego of the Culinaty Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y. "The yield may not be large, but it is easy to do, and there is very little downside to form a typographical strategy for the menu," Yang said.
However, the researchers found no difference in spending when the prices were listed as numerals with dollar signs or were spelled out.
One possible reason why diners spend less when the word "dollars" or the dollar sign is used is that "references to dollars, in words or symbol, reminds people of the 'pain of paying,'" said Kimes, the Singapore Tourism Board Distinguished Professor of Asian Hospitality Management at the Cornell School of Hotel Administration.
The researchers based their conclusions on a study of 201 diners at a café at the Culinary Institute of America. Diners were randomly given one of the three menus, on which prices were written as numerals with the dollar sign; as numerals without the dollar sign; or spelled out. For example, the price was listed either as 20, $20 or twenty dollars.
The study is available free from the Center for Hospitality Research at http://www.hotelschool.cornell.edu/research/chr/pubs/reports/2009.html.

 

Paul

Posted at dailyheadSpa.com

Tuesday
Dec062011

Price, worth, cost

Price, worth, cost. They might all mean the same thing, or they might not.

Price - what the owners or seller is trying to get for a thing.

Worth - what a thing is actually worth to me.

Cost - all that it actually costs to get; the cost to get it from where it is to where I want it, cost to insure it, maintain it, fix it, worry about it, think about it, dispose of it.

Paul

Posted at dailyheadSpa.com

Tuesday
Dec062011

The true price

Here is a story. I have no idea if it actually happened and I don’t care, I know it is true

Someone broke into a high-end jewelry store and all they did was switch around all the price tags.


Paul

Posted at dailyheadSpa.com